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TaraElla is a singer-songwriter and an author. She identifies as a classical liberal. She is also a keen supporter of marriage equality, a version of family values that is LGBT-inclusive (she calls this ‘adaptive family values’), and marriage privatization.

Contents

1 Political Beliefs
2 Projects
3 Books
4 Music
5 Freelance and Other Writing

Political Beliefs

TaraElla identifies as a classical liberal. More specifically, she has written extensively about a branch of liberalism called Moral Libertarianism, where the core principle is that each individual is to have an equal amount of moral agency. …


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Today, I want to talk about the recent conversation between Andrew Yang and Jonathan Haidt, one of my favorite contemporary political theorists, on Yang Speaks. Basically, as many of you may already be familiar with, Haidt is most famous for his view of how people have innate inclinations towards prioritizing certain moral values, which would naturally predispose them to certain politics. It’s a view that I have found to be true based on my own observations, and one that I think more people should take seriously. It’s really something that could help solve the polarization problem. I have been saying this for years, and I wish more people would listen. …


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Today, I want to talk about polarization, what has gotten us here, and how to get out of it. In light of recent events, Tulsi Gabbard and Dave Rubin had a chat about the current levels of polarization, and the seriously negative consequences it has had. Indeed, Tulsi has been very concerned about this issue for some time now, and I think she is correct to be so worried. I guess, after all that has happened in the past few years, I think most of us can agree that polarization is bad, even dangerous. We should all work to put an end to it. But to do so, we need to think about where it comes from. …


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Written by TaraElla in November 2020

In this project, we look at the ideas and contributions of great liberal thinkers from various times, and also examine how their ideas are similar, different, or otherwise interact with, the core Moral Libertarian ideal of Equal and Maximum Moral Agency for every individual.

I believe such a project is needed because we need to revive the intellectual and academic side of liberalism. As I have often said, liberalism, being an ideology that has a large footprint in mainstream Western politics, has in recent times overly focused on practical policy, and has neglected developing philosophy, theory and new ideas. …


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Today, I want to talk about libertarianism, the ideology, or at least the label, that I keep coming back to, after drifting away from it. It has happened quite a few times already. I first embraced libertarianism back in 2003, in the wake of the Iraq War and the increasing surveillance state across the West post-9/11. Thinking back, 9/11 and the Iraq War were really the political formative events for much of my generation, and many of us naturally developed a peace-orientated, establishment-skeptical worldview from there. It probably explains why libertarian ideas are so attractive to many of us.

However, over the next couple of years, particularly as the 2004 US elections centered political debate back on more pragmatic ground, I drifted away from libertarianism as I, too, focused on more pragmatic matters. And so began a pattern of drifting towards libertarianism in times of high idealism, only to walk away from it again during times of pragmatism. And it’s not just myself who has had a pattern of drifting back and forth regarding libertarianism. Many other people were in the same boat. The Iraq War and the Bush era in general led to the growth of libertarianism, but by the time Bush was gone and the conversation in Western politics had moved on, libertarian voices were rather lacking. …


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In the past few days, I have been thinking about my increasing discomfort with President Trump’s style of politics. To be fair, I have never been a fan of Trump, but the intensity of the discomfort has been getting much greater recently. From his abandonment of his party’s famous 2016 promise not to appoint a Supreme Court justice in an election year, to his repeated allegations of widespread electoral fraud without evidence, to his decision to schedule five federal executions in the lame duck period, knowing that Americans have elected someone opposed to the death penalty. …


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Welcome back to the TaraElla Report. To kick this new season off, let’s talk about one of the most controversial topics right now: critical race theory. In particular, some things left-wing commentator Vaush said in his recent video titled ‘Conservative Snowflakes Terrified by Anti-Racist Powerpoint’ has prompted me to respond. As I promised, this season will be all about quality conversations on a higher intellectual level, and that’s what we will be doing today.

The main angle Vaush seems to be taking is that conservatives fear critical race theory because they don’t want to acknowledge racism exists, and they don’t want to fix racism. To be intellectually vigorous, there are many points to unpack there. Firstly, is it just conservatives who oppose critical race theory? Secondly, is the rejection of critical race theory based on not wanting to fix racism? Finally, is critical race theory even a good framework to fix racism in the first place? …


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The mainstream media appears to have underestimated Donald Trump again. While Joe Biden has won the 2020 US Presidential race, Trump came closer than many expected. This problem isn’t limited to Trump, however. During the Democratic primaries, the media often understated the appeal of Biden, and overstated the support for candidates like Elizabeth Warren, who came a distant third.

To be fair, independent media didn’t do much better either. They too generally underestimated Trump in the general, and vastly overstated the support for Bernie Sanders (and to some extent Elizabeth Warren and Pete Buttigieg) in the primary.

I guess this is a timely reminder that the views reported in mainstream media may be biased by echo chamber effects, and not always reflective of reality on the ground. There’s also the problem of certain influential actors pushing their agendas and skewing the debate, and a conformist culture stifling real free speech and real free debate. …


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Much has been said about Joe Biden’s victory in the 2020 US Presidential elections. There has been endless analysis about Trump’s enduring popularity, the apparent poll failure, similarity and differences with 2016, and so on. However, I think these are the biggest lessons we can draw from the results:

Democrats have an advantage now

If you look at the states that have been called for Biden, up to the point where he was declared the winner, you would notice that all of them are considered blue-leaning states. Biden didn’t even win (or need to win) the classical swing states, Florida and Ohio. While it looks like Biden may win Arizona and Georgia (as of this writing, these two states are too close to call), the important point is that he doesn’t even need them. …


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Welcome back to TaraElla TV. The news is in: Joe Biden has been declared the winner of the 2020 US Presidential election by basically all the major media outlets. Congratulations are streaming in from around the world, from leaders in Canada, Britain, Australia, India, and more. In other words, Biden did it! Biden won, like I told you he would!

You see, I sort of see this as a personal vindication. The story goes back to 2017. Back then, Trump’s victory had created a crisis of worldview among many people. Seriously, that’s where it got to for many people, I’m not even exaggerating. I mean, I never liked Trump, but some people’s response was way over the top. Anyway, Hillary loss somehow led some people to be convinced that the Western world we knew was coming to an end, and that some kind of extreme response was needed. I remember telling people back then that Biden would represent the Democrats in 2020, and he had a very decent chance at winning. After all, Hillary ran an embarrassing campaign, she ran on identity politics that turned off many everyday working people, and these were weaknesses that Biden wouldn’t have. Anyway, my friends, as well as people out there on the internet, wouldn’t believe me. …

About

TaraElla

TaraElla is a singer-songwriter and author, passionate about free speech, liberty and equality. https://www.taraella.com

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